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This is the official Tumblr of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We post all sorts of museum-related goodness, plus submissions of artwork from you, our talented and magnificent followers, on Fridays.

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    The costume(s are) present today @SFMOMA. (at SFMOMA Offices)

    The costume(s are) present today @SFMOMA. (at SFMOMA Offices)

    Posted on Thursday, October 31st 2013

    Happy Halloween!Spooky fact: SFMOMA’s collection includes a large body of work by Dr. William J. Pierce, an early photographer who attempted to capture spirits on film. See for yourself!Image: Dr. William J. Pierce, “Spirit Photographs” (1903); Collection SFMOMA

    Happy Halloween!

    Spooky fact: SFMOMA’s collection includes a large body of work by Dr. William J. Pierce, an early photographer who attempted to capture spirits on film. See for yourself!

    Image: Dr. William J. Pierce, “Spirit Photographs” (1903); Collection SFMOMA

    Posted on Thursday, October 31st 2013

    prostheticknowledge:

The Emoji Art & Design Show
An exhibition put together by New York’s Eyebeam in December is looking for emoji-related artwork:

In today’s visually oriented culture, which increasingly communicates through images rather than text, emoji comprise a kind of “visual vernacular,” a language that conveys humor, ambiguity and personality as well as meaning. 
This visual form of communication isn’t necessarily new—from cave paintings, to hieroglyphics, to religious and mythological symbols encoded in traditional painting and sculpture, we’ve been communicating through images since the dawn of mankind—but its dominance in culture today, especially among millennials, seems to indicate a greater shift in our approach to self-expression.
If you’re an artist or designer working with emoji, send us your work. We’re looking for a diverse array of interpretations and appropriations of the emoji that exist both on and offline. The show welcomes new and existing works from a variety of mediums ranging from net art, to painting and sculpture, video and performance.

You can find out more about the show and how to submit at the project’s website here

    prostheticknowledge:

    The Emoji Art & Design Show

    An exhibition put together by New York’s Eyebeam in December is looking for emoji-related artwork:

    In today’s visually oriented culture, which increasingly communicates through images rather than text, emoji comprise a kind of “visual vernacular,” a language that conveys humor, ambiguity and personality as well as meaning. 

    This visual form of communication isn’t necessarily new—from cave paintings, to hieroglyphics, to religious and mythological symbols encoded in traditional painting and sculpture, we’ve been communicating through images since the dawn of mankind—but its dominance in culture today, especially among millennials, seems to indicate a greater shift in our approach to self-expression.

    If you’re an artist or designer working with emoji, send us your work. We’re looking for a diverse array of interpretations and appropriations of the emoji that exist both on and offline. The show welcomes new and existing works from a variety of mediums ranging from net art, to painting and sculpture, video and performance.

    You can find out more about the show and how to submit at the project’s website here

    Posted on Wednesday, October 30th 2013

    Reblogged from My Back Against the Record Machine

    Source prostheticknowledge