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This is the official Tumblr of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We post all sorts of museum-related goodness, plus submissions of artwork from you, our talented and magnificent followers, on Fridays.

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    On Tuesday, Google unveiled Street Art Project, an online gallery of street art. The collection of images includes work that no longer exists, raising interesting questions about the ephemeral nature of street art. 
Rachel Donadio noted some of the challenges facing the project in a New York Times article, including the politics surrounding “a private database of public art.”

Explore the Street Art Project→
Read “Google Adds Graffiti to Its Art Portfolio,” in the New York Times→

    On Tuesday, Google unveiled Street Art Project, an online gallery of street art. The collection of images includes work that no longer exists, raising interesting questions about the ephemeral nature of street art. 

    Rachel Donadio noted some of the challenges facing the project in a New York Times article, including the politics surrounding “a private database of public art.”

    Explore the Street Art Project

    Read “Google Adds Graffiti to Its Art Portfolio,” in the New York Times

    Posted on Wednesday, June 11th 2014

    The Second World Festival of Black Arts and Culture, FESTAC ‘77, featured 40,000 artists convening in Lagos, Nigeria for cultural festival that rivaled the size of the Olympics.
It was a festival that featured names like Stevie Wonder and Sun Ra. It brought together visual artists, musicians and writers.
What is baffling is how an event so large has remained in near obscurity.
If you haven’t heard of FESTAC ‘77, you aren’t alone. On view in San Francisco Public Library through June 29, Chimurenga Library activates the library to begin uncovering the history of this significant festival. 
Enjoy the journey…
Want to learn more? Visit the Chimurenga Library blog→
Need more information about the exhibition→

    The Second World Festival of Black Arts and Culture, FESTAC ‘77, featured 40,000 artists convening in Lagos, Nigeria for cultural festival that rivaled the size of the Olympics.

    It was a festival that featured names like Stevie Wonder and Sun Ra. It brought together visual artists, musicians and writers.

    What is baffling is how an event so large has remained in near obscurity.

    If you haven’t heard of FESTAC ‘77, you aren’t alone. On view in San Francisco Public Library through June 29, Chimurenga Library activates the library to begin uncovering the history of this significant festival. 

    Enjoy the journey…

    Want to learn more? Visit the Chimurenga Library blog

    Need more information about the exhibition

    Posted on Tuesday, June 10th 2014

    Reblogged from Chimurenga Library

    In case you needed an excuse to post that hilarious photo hidden in the depths of your phone’s photo folder… 

    In case you needed an excuse to post that hilarious photo hidden in the depths of your phone’s photo folder… 

    Posted on Tuesday, June 10th 2014

    yoursfmoma:

Shawn: You want to paint?  Me: Yes.  Shawn: I need to make a Jackson Pollock.  Me: OK! We should probably do this outside. (later) Shawn: We should really have some music. Can you play ‘because I’m happy’? When that comes on, I really start firing. #playartfully #jacksonpollock #bestwaytospendtheevening #weloveart by csmonaghan2012 http://ift.tt/1koShrJ

Well, this is adorable! A young Pollock on the rise :)

    yoursfmoma:

    Shawn: You want to paint?
    Me: Yes.
    Shawn: I need to make a Jackson Pollock.
    Me: OK! We should probably do this outside. (later)
    Shawn: We should really have some music. Can you play ‘because I’m happy’? When that comes on, I really start firing. #playartfully #jacksonpollock #bestwaytospendtheevening #weloveart by csmonaghan2012 http://ift.tt/1koShrJ

    Well, this is adorable! A young Pollock on the rise :)

    Posted on Sunday, June 8th 2014

    Reblogged from

    Photographer David Goldblatt describes the world of Billy Monk.

    As a bouncer at the Catacombs, a seedy nightclub in Cape Town, South Africa, Monk had no formal training as a photographer when he began taking photos. Monk photographed the patrons of the nightclub, capturing intimate moments.

    Works by both artists are included in Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa, on view at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts through June 29.

    Posted on Sunday, June 8th 2014