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This is the official Tumblr of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We post all sorts of museum-related goodness, plus submissions of artwork from you, our talented and magnificent followers, on Fridays.

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    legionofhonormuseum:

Sarah Stein (left), one of a family of influential art collectors that included her husband, Michael, and his brother and sister Leo and Gertrude Stein, achieved an intimate connection with Henri Matisse. Acting as an early patron, enduring admirer, and close friend to the artist, Matisse purportedly said of Sarah, “She knows my paintings better than I do.” 
Matisse arduously worked on this depiction of his friend, before arriving at a painting that some believe reveals Sarah’s true likeness. Sarah, on the other hand, thought she looked “too French.”
Matisse from SFMOMA is now on view. 

Learn more about Matisse’s friendship with Sarah Stein by watching this terrific video:

    legionofhonormuseum:

    Sarah Stein (left), one of a family of influential art collectors that included her husband, Michael, and his brother and sister Leo and Gertrude Stein, achieved an intimate connection with Henri Matisse. Acting as an early patron, enduring admirer, and close friend to the artist, Matisse purportedly said of Sarah, “She knows my paintings better than I do.” 

    Matisse arduously worked on this depiction of his friend, before arriving at a painting that some believe reveals Sarah’s true likeness. Sarah, on the other hand, thought she looked “too French.”

    Matisse from SFMOMA is now on view. 

    Learn more about Matisse’s friendship with Sarah Stein by watching this terrific video:

    Posted on Monday, December 9th 2013

    Reblogged from Legion of Honor

    manpodcast:

    This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Serge Guilbaut, the editor of the recently published "Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview." This week’s show was taped live at Getty Center.

    "Chatting with Matisse," which was published by Getty Publications, is a fascinating book: In 1941 art historian Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. Scholars have known about the interview for some time, but it’s never been published, or even widely available, until now. This beautiful new publication includes essays by Guilbaut, Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorleac. Chris Miller translated the interview.

    Guilbaut is professor emeritus at The University of British Columbia. His previous projects include the book “How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War.”

    Near the end of this week’s program, Guilbaut and host Tyler Green talked about the design of the cover for the new Getty Publications book and how closely it hews to Matisse’s own design for the cover of the book he initially hoped would be published in the early 1940s. This image is a letter Matisse wrote that shows his suggested design.

    How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 

    Perfect listening material before (or after) paying a visit to Matisse from SFMOMA at the Legion of Honor!

    Posted on Tuesday, November 26th 2013

    Reblogged from The Modern Art Notes Podcast

    FROM THE SFMOMA PRESS ROOM:
We are thrilled to announce Matisse from SFMOMA, a jointly organized exhibition by SFMOMA and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco which will bring together the work of Henri Matisse from both institutions’ collections. Opening on November 9 at the Legion of Honor, the exhibition will run for nearly a year.
In addition, Alexander Calder’s Big Crinkly, a lively kinetic sculpture from SFMOMA’s collection, is also on view at the de Young!
For more information, read the full press release.
Photo: Winni Wintermeyer

    FROM THE SFMOMA PRESS ROOM:

    We are thrilled to announce Matisse from SFMOMA, a jointly organized exhibition by SFMOMA and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco which will bring together the work of Henri Matisse from both institutions’ collections. Opening on November 9 at the Legion of Honor, the exhibition will run for nearly a year.

    In addition, Alexander Calder’s Big Crinkly, lively kinetic sculpture from SFMOMA’s collection, is also on view at the de Young!

    For more information, read the full press release.

    Photo: Winni Wintermeyer

    Posted on Thursday, October 10th 2013

    Happy birthday to Henri Matisse, born 143 years ago today!
You’ve likely seen many paintings by Matisse, but have you ever looked closely at his drawings? For Henri Matisse, drawing was an intimate medium, a means of capturing the fleeting gestures and emotions of both subject and artist.  He made drawings to work out problems of structure and composition for subsequent works. Matisse viewed printmaking as an extension of drawing, and would turn to printmaking after extended periods of painting, as if to digest his experience through the use of a new medium.  Between the years of 1900 and 1954, Matisse created more than 800 prints!
Image: Henri Matisse, Fée au chapeau de clarté, Souvenir du Mallarmé (Fairy in a Luminous Hat, Souvenir of Mallarmé), as viewed through Artscope.

    Happy birthday to Henri Matisse, born 143 years ago today!

    You’ve likely seen many paintings by Matisse, but have you ever looked closely at his drawings? For Henri Matisse, drawing was an intimate medium, a means of capturing the fleeting gestures and emotions of both subject and artist.  He made drawings to work out problems of structure and composition for subsequent works. Matisse viewed printmaking as an extension of drawing, and would turn to printmaking after extended periods of painting, as if to digest his experience through the use of a new medium.  Between the years of 1900 and 1954, Matisse created more than 800 prints!

    Image: Henri Matisse, Fée au chapeau de clarté, Souvenir du Mallarmé (Fairy in a Luminous Hat, Souvenir of Mallarmé), as viewed through Artscope.

    Posted on Monday, December 31st 2012

    chromaticattic:


Femme au chapeau (or, Woman with a Hat) by Henri Matisse, 1905.
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

One of my favorite paintings I saw today. I really like, and am fascinated with, Matisse’s use of vivid colors and his eclectic color palette. The subject of Femme au chapeau is his wife, Amélie. 

Learn a whole bunch about Matisse’s Femme au chapeau in this interactive feature!

    chromaticattic:

    Femme au chapeau (or, Woman with a Hat) by Henri Matisse, 1905.

    San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

    One of my favorite paintings I saw today. I really like, and am fascinated with, Matisse’s use of vivid colors and his eclectic color palette. The subject of Femme au chapeau is his wife, Amélie. 

    Learn a whole bunch about Matisse’s Femme au chapeau in this interactive feature!

    Posted on Monday, September 17th 2012

    Reblogged from formerly chromaticattic

    cpinart:

Henri Matisse - Laurette in a pink chair; 1917.

Creating a color palette from a painting seems like a pretty fabulous idea! If you could instantly redecorate one room in your home using the color palette of a famous work of art, what room/artwork would you choose?
You can use this handy color palette generator to experiment with different works of art.
(Feel free to go all out and show us what you’d do using our submit page!)

    cpinart:

    Henri Matisse - Laurette in a pink chair; 1917.

    Creating a color palette from a painting seems like a pretty fabulous idea! If you could instantly redecorate one room in your home using the color palette of a famous work of art, what room/artwork would you choose?

    You can use this handy color palette generator to experiment with different works of art.

    (Feel free to go all out and show us what you’d do using our submit page!)

    Posted on Monday, September 17th 2012

    Reblogged from color palette