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This is the official Tumblr of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We post all sorts of museum-related goodness, plus submissions of artwork from you, our talented and magnificent followers, on Fridays.

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    Robert Rauschenberg, Rosalie/Red Cheek/Temporary Letter/Stock, 1971; Collection SFMOMA, Phyllis C. Wattis Fund for Major Accessions; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York Detail of Rosalie/Red Cheek/Temporary Letter/Stock, 1971; Collection SFMOMA, Phyllis C. Wattis Fund for Major Accessions; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY Detail of Rosalie/Red Cheek/Temporary Letter/Stock, 1971; Collection SFMOMA, Phyllis C. Wattis Fund for Major Accessions; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    SFMOMA NEWS: Meet Rosalie

    SFMOMA has just acquired a 1971 wall sculpture by Robert Rauschenberg titled Rosalie / Red Cheek / Temporary Letter / Stock. Rauschenberg moved from New York to Captiva Island, Florida, in fall 1970, and began a new series, the Cardboards, that repurposed used boxes as raw material for sculpture. Rosalie neatly encapsulates this Florida-to-New York transition through two mailing labels that the artist affixed to the “Red Cheek” apple cider box during his move. He addressed one label to himself in the general delivery for Captiva; the other, a return label, bears the address of his New York studio. 

    SFMOMA acquired Rosalie through the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation’s Artwork Gift and Purchase program, and the sculpture has been added to the Rauschenberg Research Project, our online Rauschenberg catalogue published last summer.

    Posted on Wednesday, March 5th 2014

    FROM THE SFMOMA PRESS ROOM:
We are thrilled to announce Matisse from SFMOMA, a jointly organized exhibition by SFMOMA and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco which will bring together the work of Henri Matisse from both institutions’ collections. Opening on November 9 at the Legion of Honor, the exhibition will run for nearly a year.
In addition, Alexander Calder’s Big Crinkly, a lively kinetic sculpture from SFMOMA’s collection, is also on view at the de Young!
For more information, read the full press release.
Photo: Winni Wintermeyer

    FROM THE SFMOMA PRESS ROOM:

    We are thrilled to announce Matisse from SFMOMA, a jointly organized exhibition by SFMOMA and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco which will bring together the work of Henri Matisse from both institutions’ collections. Opening on November 9 at the Legion of Honor, the exhibition will run for nearly a year.

    In addition, Alexander Calder’s Big Crinkly, lively kinetic sculpture from SFMOMA’s collection, is also on view at the de Young!

    For more information, read the full press release.

    Photo: Winni Wintermeyer

    Posted on Thursday, October 10th 2013

    Did you know that Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly traveled through Italy, Morocco, and Spain together? They studied ancient architecture, visited ethnographic museums, and frequented flea markets, accumulating experiences and images that would directly inform their artwork. Learn more by exploring our Rauschenberg Research Project!Image: Robert Rauschenberg, “Cy + Roman Steps (I–V)”, 1952; Collection SFMOMA, purchase through a gift of Phyllis Wattis; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    Did you know that Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly traveled through Italy, Morocco, and Spain together? They studied ancient architecture, visited ethnographic museums, and frequented flea markets, accumulating experiences and images that would directly inform their artwork. 

    Learn more by exploring our Rauschenberg Research Project!

    Image: Robert Rauschenberg, “Cy + Roman Steps (I–V)”, 1952; Collection SFMOMA, purchase through a gift of Phyllis Wattis; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    Posted on Monday, July 22nd 2013

    No, these aren’t blank canvases – they’re Robert Rauschenberg’s White Paintings!Rauschenberg’s aim was to create a painting that looked untouched by human hands, as though it had simply arrived in the world fully formed and absolutely pure. In 1961, composer John Cage famously referred to the White Paintings as airports for lights, shadows, and particles, establishing an enduring understanding of the series as receptive surfaces that respond to the world around them. Building on this reading, Rauschenberg once referred to the works as clocks, saying that if one were sensitive enough to the subtle changes on their surfaces one could tell what time it was and what the weather was like outside. Ultimately, the power of the White Paintings lies in the shifts in attention they require from the viewer, asking us to slow down, watch closely over time, and inspect their mute painted surfaces for subtle shifts in color, light, and texture.Image: Robert Rauschenberg, White Painting [three panel], 1951; Collection SFMOMA, purchase through a gift of Phyllis Wattis; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    No, these aren’t blank canvases – they’re Robert Rauschenberg’s White Paintings!

    Rauschenberg’s aim was to create a painting that looked untouched by human hands, as though it had simply arrived in the world fully formed and absolutely pure. In 1961, composer John Cage famously referred to the White Paintings as airports for lights, shadows, and particles, establishing an enduring understanding of the series as receptive surfaces that respond to the world around them. Building on this reading, Rauschenberg once referred to the works as clocks, saying that if one were sensitive enough to the subtle changes on their surfaces one could tell what time it was and what the weather was like outside. Ultimately, the power of the White Paintings lies in the shifts in attention they require from the viewer, asking us to slow down, watch closely over time, and inspect their mute painted surfaces for subtle shifts in color, light, and texture.

    Image: Robert Rauschenberg, White Painting [three panel], 1951; Collection SFMOMA, purchase through a gift of Phyllis Wattis; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    Posted on Thursday, July 18th 2013

    Robert Rauschenberg’s Quiet House—Black Mountain (pictured here) was taken by the artist when he was in his early twenties, just beginning his journey as an artist. In our newly-launched online Rauschenberg Research Project, you can learn more about this early photograph and explore related materials, photographs, and museum documents.Image: Robert Rauschenberg, “Quiet House—Black Mountain”, 1949; printed 1981; Collection SFMOMA, purchase through a gift of Phyllis Wattis; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    Robert Rauschenberg’s Quiet House—Black Mountain (pictured here) was taken by the artist when he was in his early twenties, just beginning his journey as an artist. In our newly-launched online Rauschenberg Research Project, you can learn more about this early photograph and explore related materials, photographs, and museum documents.

    Image: Robert Rauschenberg, “Quiet House—Black Mountain”, 1949; printed 1981; Collection SFMOMA, purchase through a gift of Phyllis Wattis; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    Posted on Tuesday, July 16th 2013