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This is the official Tumblr of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We post all sorts of museum-related goodness, plus submissions of artwork from you, our talented and magnificent followers, on Fridays.

In the mood for a meatier read? Check out Open Space, SFMOMA's official blog.

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    Gallery view of Public Intimacy, on view at YBCA Gallery view of Public Intimacy, on view at YBCA A view of Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse's Gallery view of Public Intimacy, on view at YBCA Kemang Wa Lehulere's Kemang Wa Lehulere's Gallery view of Public Intimacy, on view at YBCA

    CLOSING: Public Intimacy at YBCA

    Disrupting expected images of South Africa, Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa explores the poetics and politics of the everyday. Coinciding with the 20th anniversary of democracy in South Africa, Public Intimacy reveals the nuances of human interaction in a country still undergoing significant change. 
    The exhibition closes Sunday, June 29.

    Posted on Friday, June 27th 2014

    photo credit: Andria Lo
photo credit: Andria Lo photo credit: Andria Lo photo credit: Andria Lo photo credit: Andria Lo

    "Culture is essentially dynamic: in other words it is both rooted in the people and orientated toward the future."
    — Pan-African Cultural Manifesto, Organization of African Unity: First All African Cultural Festival, Algiers, July/August 1969

    There are only a few more days to check out the multimedia installation, Chimurenga Library, on view at the main branch of the San Francisco Public Library. Delve in to the history of FESTAC ‘77, as the library is transformed into a book, with guided paths to uncover stories from the largest Pan-African arts festival.

    Bonus (art) points if you make it over to Gorgeous, next door at the Asian Art Museum!

    [photo credit: Andria Lo]

    Posted on Friday, June 27th 2014

    As a curtain, a passageway between two spaces, Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ "Untitled" (Golden) can be read in the context of his biography. When Gonzalez-Torres conceived of the piece, he had lost his beloved partner Ross Laycock to AIDS, and he was succumbing himself. Gonzalez-Torres, however, did not want understanding of his works to tie too closely to his biography.

    "It’s important to consider the artist’s intention for the actual meanings of the work to accrue over time as changing audiences contemplate the work’s quiet universality."

    - Emilie Keldie, the Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation

    How do you respond to Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s curtain of golden beads?

    Posted on Wednesday, June 25th 2014

    Bejeweled and begrimed. Seductive yet repulsive. Marilyn Minter’s Strut, a dirty heel wearing a Dior stiletto, is enamel painted on metal.
Allison Harding, assistant curator of contemporary art at the Asian Art Museum, writes:

Despite the excesses of Minter’s work, I cannot stop staring at one small speck of grime on the larger-than-life heel. It is just under the fleshy, swollen fold of the skin right about where the ankle meets the heel. It looks wet, three-dimensional, and for reasons I cannot quite express, outright disgusting. I feel this filthy speck and it sends shivers down my spine, undoing the façade of glamorous. It is just too close to real life. Of course, this is exactly the point. Minter’s subject reminds us that, in the end even the most glamorous figure will be covered in dirt.


How do you respond to Strut? Is it beautiful? Revolting? Glamorous? Gorgeous? Or something else?


Gorgeous brings together the collections of the Asian Art Museum and SFMOMA. The exhibition, on view at the Asian Art Museum, explores the extremes and ambiguities of beauty, inviting viewers to draw their own conclusions.

    Bejeweled and begrimed. Seductive yet repulsive. Marilyn Minter’s Strut, a dirty heel wearing a Dior stiletto, is enamel painted on metal.

    Allison Harding, assistant curator of contemporary art at the Asian Art Museum, writes:

    Despite the excesses of Minter’s work, I cannot stop staring at one small speck of grime on the larger-than-life heel. It is just under the fleshy, swollen fold of the skin right about where the ankle meets the heel. It looks wet, three-dimensional, and for reasons I cannot quite express, outright disgusting. I feel this filthy speck and it sends shivers down my spine, undoing the façade of glamorous. It is just too close to real life. Of course, this is exactly the point. Minter’s subject reminds us that, in the end even the most glamorous figure will be covered in dirt.

    How do you respond to Strut? Is it beautiful? Revolting? Glamorous? Gorgeous? Or something else?

    Gorgeous brings together the collections of the Asian Art Museum and SFMOMA. The exhibition, on view at the Asian Art Museum, explores the extremes and ambiguities of beauty, inviting viewers to draw their own conclusions.

    Posted on Monday, June 23rd 2014

    asianartmuseum:

    Here’s some Gorgeous exhibition behind-the-scenes goodness for you, including a shot of our freshly installed Dakini, a goddess of Tibetan Buddhism enlightenment, with SFMOMA’s Felix Gonzalez-Torres golden beads piece. If it doesn’t compel you to come to our opening party Grit & Glamour next Friday, well…we don’t know what will. 

    Dancing, voguing, nail art by TopCoat Nail Studio, and more

    Contemplating beauty with some of these radical juxtapositions. Centuries of art converging to beg the question… what is Gorgeous?

    Posted on Tuesday, June 17th 2014

    Reblogged from ASIAN ART MUSEUM

    As of today, it’s been one year since we closed our building for expansion construction, and MY what a year it’s been!

    We’re looking forward to another year of jumping around the Bay Area, because before too long, we’ll be back in our building :)

    Posted on Tuesday, June 3rd 2014

    Installation of Chimurenga Library is in progress.

    The San Francisco Public Library is in the process of temporarily becoming a giant book that will uncover stories about the origins and legacies of FESTAC ‘77.

    The temporary exhibition, on view May 24 through June 29, has been created by the newspaper, Chimurenga, based in Cape Town, South Africa. It is organized by SFMOMA and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) in partnership with the library.

    So, what is FESTAC ’77, you might wonder..

    FESTAC ’77 was the Second World Festival of Black Arts and Culture, which was a pan-African cultural festival that took place over a month in Lagos, Nigeria in 1977. It included visual arts exhibitions, music and dance performances, and an extensive scholarly conference that featured the major black intellectuals of the day. It was a life-altering experience for many participants and attendees, but very little has been written about it.

    The exhibition is designed to investigate why that is, and to link the story of the festival to the Bay Area, and to many other stories.

    Follow the project on Tumblr here

    Photo credit: Chimurenga Library; Platform 1 installation, photo: Andria Lo.

    Posted on Thursday, May 22nd 2014